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Selfish Genes and Christian Ethics

The Theological-ethical Implications of Evolutionary Biology

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Publisher: SCM Press
ISBN-13: 9780334029960
Published: 30/03/2007
Product description
The evolutionary origins of human beings, and in particular the origins of human morality, have always attracted debate and speculation, not just in the academic community but in popular science and the wider general population as well. The arguments and explanations put forward over the years seem to thoroughly catch the popular imagination, but there is the danger that these explanations tend to step outside the bounds of scientific theory and become powerful popular myths instead. In Neil Messer's "Selfish Genes and Christian Ethics", the author is challenging this tendency. Instead, he provides a Christian theological anthropology, which, among other things, aims to give Christians and the churches the confidence to engage with assumptions that evolutionary theory and religious beliefs are untenable. This is a valuable resource for anyone engaged in the study of theology, providing the reader with the ability to consider both the theoretical and the practical questions raised by evolutionary discussions of ethics and morality.
Author Information

Neil Messer

Dr Neil Messer is currently the Director of the Centre for Contemporary and Pastoral Theology in the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of Wales, Lampeter. He lectures in Christian Theology with particular interests in Christian ethics; medical ethics; ethics and biotechnology; science and theology and practical and pastoral theology.